Though GF100 may be the next big thing coming from the Green team, the next Geforce products arriving soon are the entry-level Geforce GT 200 series cards (not to be confused with the die GT200 on GTX 200 series products) Geforce GT 220 and the Geforce GT 240. Both are based on 40nm, DX10.1 chips.

The Geforce GT 220 is just 2 days away – releasing on 12th October, a day before the HD 5700 series. It is a 48SP budget part selling for under $70. It is not quite clear what these are going up against – though the HD 4650 would make sense.

The Geforce GT 240 is based on the GT216 die – packing a rumoured 96 SP. Considering the leap in processing power and a different die, perhaps GTS 220 would be a more appropriate name. It could change, but the latest rumours name this card as the GT 240.

More details next page.

Though GF100 may be the next big thing coming from the Green team, the
next Geforce products arriving soon are the entry-level Geforce GT 220
and the Geforce GT 240. Both are based on 40nm, DX10.1 chips.

The
Geforce GT 220 is just 2 days away – releasing on 12th October, a day
before the HD 5700 series. It is a 48SP budget part, based on GT216,
selling for under $70. It is not quite clear what these are going up
against – though the HD 4650 would make sense, in which case it will end up quite a bit slower.

The Geforce GT
240 is based on the GT215 die – packing a rumoured 96 SP. Compare this with the 112SP of the 9800 GT and 128SP of the GTS 250. It is, however, clocked much lower, and restricted to a 128-bit memory interface. Considering
the leap in processing power, perhaps GTS 220 would be a more
appropriate name. It could change, but the latest rumours name this card
as the GT 240. Expreview have posted preliminary 3dMark benchmarks, courtesy of it168.com.

The GT 240 comes in two variants – 1GB DDR3 and 512MB GDDR5, tied to a 128-bit memory interface. It is clear that GDDR5 frees a considerable bottleneck, and the GDDR5 GT 240 ends up shy of the old lady 9800 GT and on par with the 9600 GT.

Like the GT 220, we don’t know what ATI cards the GT 240 is being pitched against. Perhaps the HD 4670, which is currently priced at $69. The GT215 does have a slight die size advantage (~20 mm2) to the 4670′s RV730, though this probably wouldn’t offset the more expensive and low-yielding 40nm process on the GT 220. Around the same die size on the 40nm process, we have ATI’s nearly half a year old HD 4770, which should be much faster than the GT 240. We can expect price cuts for the HD 4770 following the release of HD 5750 too. 

The HD 5750 will of course shake up the >$100 segment. Below which, we can look forward to a battle between the HD 4600, 4700 and GT 200 products before Redwood and Cedar arrive in January 2010. We will wait till next week’s release of the HD 5750 and the GT 220 for things to become clearer.

It must be noted that neither of these cards are particularly new, having been taped out way back in Q2 ’09, and announced in June. They have even done rounds in select OEM and mobile products, but for whatever reason, they are only releasing to retail in October. Naysayers would cite “40nm yield issues”.

That leaves GT218 – the final GT200b 40nm derivative. We can expect this to end up branded G 2xx, priced well below $50.

Reference: Expreview