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24 monitors, FPS gaming for you sir?

Engadget has a scoop about a crazy set of systems, hooked to 24 LCD displays,
with a total resolution of 10240 x 3072. With this sort of resolution, it
requires a set 12 Linux servers running distributed computing software to drive
the monster displays. But with this sort of power, it could only do Quake III at
just 15 to 30 fps. Mega displays are not meant for gaming, just yet. “Leading
the life of an Engadget editor, you don’t ever think you could come upon a rig
or setup with too much screen real estate. Sure, you can overcompensate in any
number of ways — like, say, too much drive space (what, you really need
8TB?)
— but pixel acreage never struck us as one of them. Until now. Say hello to
Virginia Tech’s 31 million pixel-pusher friends, their 24 display array
“workstation” runs at 10240 x 3072. Apparently it takes 12 Linux servers running
distributed computing software to operate, and can play Quake III at 15-30FPS.
Well done, sirs, well done. We take it back, it’s not too much. It’s never
too much.”

Engadget has a scoop about a crazy set of systems, hooked to 24 LCD displays,
with a total resolution of 10240 x 3072. With this sort of resolution, it
requires a set 12 Linux servers running distributed computing software to drive
the monster displays. But with this sort of power, it could only do Quake III at
just 15 to 30 fps. Mega displays are not meant for gaming, just yet. "Leading
the life of an Engadget editor, you don’t ever think you could come upon a rig
or setup with too much screen real estate. Sure, you can overcompensate in any
number of ways — like, say, too much drive space (what, you really need
8TB?)
— but pixel acreage never struck us as one of them. Until now. Say hello to
Virginia Tech’s 31 million pixel-pusher friends, their 24 display array
"workstation" runs at 10240 x 3072. Apparently it takes 12 Linux servers running
distributed computing software to operate, and can play Quake III at 15-30FPS.
Well done, sirs, well done. We take it back, it’s not too much. It’s never
too much."

TeamVR
http://vrzone.com
VR-Zone is a leading online technology news publication reporting on bleeding edge trends in PC and mobile gadgets, with in-depth reviews and commentaries.

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