googledontbeevil 9 out of 10 people have not read Googles new privacy policy

Nine out of ten people have not read Google's new privacy policy, a study by Big Brother Watch and YouGov has revealed.

Nine out of ten people have not read Google's new privacy policy, a study by Big Brother Watch and YouGov has revealed.

 
Despite Google plastering links and notices to its new privacy policy all over its numerous websites and services, only 12 percent of Google users have read the changes.
 
Even more worryingly, a whopping 47 percent of British adults did not know that a new privacy policy is coming into effect on 1 March, despite 92 percent of online British users employing Google on a regular basis.
 
Only 40 percent of users think Google should implement the policy change this week. This is likely because they want more time to read it, or are simply content with how things are run now.
 
The policy change will take Google's roughly 60 separate privacy policies and replace them with a single unified policy that contains more detail, a move which the company claims will make it simpler and easier to understand Google's stance on privacy.
 
google privacypolicy 9 out of 10 people have not read Googles new privacy policy
 
“The impact of Google’s new policy cannot be understated, but the public are in the dark about what the changes actually mean,” said Nick Pickles, director of Big Brother Watch. “Companies should not be allowed to bury in legal jargon and vague statements how they may monitor what we do online, where we use our phones and even listen to what we say in calls. This change isn’t about Google collecting more data, it’s about letting the company combine what’s in your emails with the videos you watch and the things you search for.”
 
Big Brother Watch has contacted the UK's Information Commissioner to ask for an investigation of Google's privacy policy change and whether or not it breaks UK data protection law. The Article 29 Working Party has filed a similar request with the data protection authorities of other European Union member states.
 
“If people don’t understand what is happening to their personal information, how can they make an informed choice about using a service?” added Pickles. “Google is putting advertiser’s interests before user privacy and should not be rushing ahead before the public understand what the changes will mean.”
 
You can read the new privacy policy here.