The DPI adjustment button works perfectly fine without drivers, but naturally we decided to install the included drivers to see what additional functionality they offered.

main buttons settings A4Tech X 718 Gaming Mouse

The main configuration panel allows you to assign which button does what. There is an entire army of functions to choose from, including two special ones called “NetJump” and “LuckyJump”, which we will go into later.The double-click speed can be found here. The option to reverse the button configuration for left-hand usage is also found here, but as we found earlier, this mouse seems designed for right-hand use only. For some reason, the sensitivity controls are not located here.

By now, you would have noticed the X7-Jump button. This leads us to a separate configuration window.

x7jump main A4Tech X 718 Gaming Mouse

Here we find the previously missing software sensitivity control. A unique function to create your own keystrokes can also be found here, presumably for gamers to assign functions such as reload, switch weapon, etc.

x7jump onebyone A4Tech X 718 Gaming Mouse

x7jump consecutive A4Tech X 718 Gaming Mouse

There are two different modes for recording your keystrokes. Essentially, the first mode allows you to hold down the assigned button for repeated ‘spamming’ of the keystroke, while the second mode activates the keystroke only once. Even if the user decides to hold the button down, the action will not be repeated for the second mode.

For the first mode, you can record your keystrokes separately, while the second mode requires you to record the desired keystrokes all at once in the desired order. We managed to record a long series of keystrokes with the second mode, but we wonder why A4Tech did not allow recording of the keystrokes seperately for this mode, since the user might want to record long keystrokes without the hassle of holding down multiple keys during recording.