AACS Copy Protection Standard For DVDs

A group of high-profile technology companies and movie studios have joined
forces to create a new copy protection standard for DVDs that could allow
high-definition movies to be copied and used inside home networks. Dubbed
Advanced Access Content System, or AACS, the technology would replace the
anticopying technology that now protects ordinary DVDs, but it would be focused
on next-generation, high-definition discs. The group behind the technology
includes IBM, Intel, Warner Bros., Disney, Microsoft, Sony and Panasonic, as
well as Toshiba.

Unlike today’s technology, which allows movies to be played only in
authorized DVD players, AACS would potentially allow people to store copies of a
movie on home computers and watch it on other devices connected to a network–or
even transfer it to a portable movie player. Like CSS, the new AACS technology
would be added to a disc as it is created and would require specific hardware or
software to have the "key" to unlock the content on the disc. Technology
specifications and licenses ready later this year and will provide licenses to
all content, technology or consumers electronics companies.


A group of high-profile technology companies and movie studios have joined
forces to create a new copy protection standard for DVDs that could allow
high-definition movies to be copied and used inside home networks. Dubbed
Advanced Access Content System, or AACS, the technology would replace the
anticopying technology that now protects ordinary DVDs, but it would be focused
on next-generation, high-definition discs. The group behind the technology
includes IBM, Intel, Warner Bros., Disney, Microsoft, Sony and Panasonic, as
well as Toshiba.

Unlike today’s technology, which allows movies to be played only in
authorized DVD players, AACS would potentially allow people to store copies of a
movie on home computers and watch it on other devices connected to a network–or
even transfer it to a portable movie player. Like CSS, the new AACS technology
would be added to a disc as it is created and would require specific hardware or
software to have the "key" to unlock the content on the disc. Technology
specifications and licenses ready later this year and will provide licenses to
all content, technology or consumers electronics companies.

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