acer Acer To Make Dual Booting Standard For All Dual Core Netbooks

Apparently, Acer Inc thinks that having only one operating system on a netbook is too limiting for users. That is probably why the company has announced a new policy: all future Acer Aspire One netbooks fitted with dual-core processors will gain an additional Android OS alongside the bundled Windows 7 as part of the standard configuration.

acer logo1 Acer To Make Dual Booting Standard For All Dual Core Netbooks

Most notebooks usually comes with only one operating system loaded in it at retail. And more often than not, that operating system bundled with the system is usually some version of Windows, barring extremely rare circumstances where other systems may be loaded in place of it.

But apparently for Acer, loading only one operating system is not enough. As a result, the company has announced that it plans to make dual-booting a standard feature on asome of its netbooks. According to a news report by DIGITIMES, the Taiwanese computer company will be bundling both Windows 7 and Android into future Aspire One netbooks sporting dual-core processors, such as the Atom N550, as part of the stock configuration.

acer Acer To Make Dual Booting Standard For All Dual Core Netbooks

Acer claims making dual-boot a standard specification will allow for its dual-core Aspire One netbooks “to provide more efficiency to its consumers”. It also noted that adopting Google’s Android operating system will not cost the company much, thus resulting in a win-win situation for both parties.

While it is not uncommon to find users creating their own multi-boot systems, it is worth pointing out that very few OEMs are willing to sell machines that are pre-loaded with anything else but Windows. And the fact that Acer is now moving to make multi-boot a default configuration instead on an opt-in feature is probably the biggest sign that the world is slowly transitioning away from Windows in favor of alternative operating systems.

Of course, there is still one burning question: will greater adoption of alternative operating systems mean the eventual death of Windows? That is probably something that only time can tell. But at the very least, consumers now know that they have a choice when it comes to choosing an OS for their new computer. And choice is always good for the consumer, is it not?

Source: DIGITIMES