Like any good soap opera, the story of the Nexus 5 is advancing sluggishly and encounters spectacular twists and turns with each new episode. Rumored to be manufactured by Motorola about ten days back, the N5 appeared to leak yesterday complete with familiar LG branding.

LG Optimus L9 II1 Alleged LG Nexus 5 image might be of Optimus L9 II, Motorola made N5 back in the cards

But that’s of course not the end of it, as infamous tipster @evleaks has earlier today come forward with a “public service announcement”. According to the Twitter user, yesterday’s photo, which showcased the back of a mystery LG phone, might have actually starred the soon to be unveiled Optimus L9 II.

That particular handheld has been making (timid) waves in the rumor mill for a good couple of months now, though this is actually the first time we’re getting a clear, unobstructed look at both its front and sexy back.

Highly resembling its predecessor from a visual standpoint, the Optimus  L9 II is expected to sport a display of around 5 inches and either a Snapdragon S4 Pro or a 400 CPU. That should make it a fairly decent mid-range contender, provided of course LG is wise enough to hit the pricing sweet spot.

lg google nexus 5 Alleged LG Nexus 5 image might be of Optimus L9 II, Motorola made N5 back in the cards

Now, exactly how trustworthy is this story? I wouldn’t say I trust it with my life, especially that @evleaks himself says the claimed LG Nexus 5 is “probably” the L9 II, but it’s clearly much more credible than yesterday’s report.

Plus, I never really believed someone as well-connected as Taylor Wimberly could be wrong about Motorola working on the N5, so it’s nice to see I wasn’t so completely wrong about that.

What I’d want to hear from you is whether you’re relieved to see Moto in contention for the next Nexus family member again, or pissed that LG might not get a chance to follow up on last year’s N4 after all. I think I’ll go for the former, as I wasn’t really that psyched about the Nexus 4 and how LG handled the delicate supply and demand issues in late 2012 and early 2013.

Source: Twitter