AMD has pulled the plug on its Personal Internet Communicator, once envisioned as a low-cost computer for the developing world. The PIC was introduced in 2004 as part of AMD’s 50×15 project, in which the company has pledged to help bring Internet access to half the world’s population by 2015. The device cost $ 185 and came with one of AMD’s Geode processors. Simply put, there was little interest in the PIC. It was designed for emerging markets like India. Intel has its own low-cost laptop design for students, Microsoft wants to hook people up to the Internet through their cell phones, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nicholas Negroponte are hawking the One Laptop Per Child initiative. AMD’s Geode processors are being used in the One Laptop Per Child design.

AMD has pulled the plug on its Personal Internet Communicator, once envisioned as a low-cost computer for the developing world. The PIC was introduced in 2004 as part of AMD’s 50×15 project, in which the company has pledged to help bring Internet access to half the world’s population by 2015. The device cost $ 185 and came with one of AMD’s Geode processors. Simply put, there was little interest in the PIC. It was designed for emerging markets like India. Intel has its own low-cost laptop design for students, Microsoft wants to hook people up to the Internet through their cell phones, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Nicholas Negroponte are hawking the One Laptop Per Child initiative. AMD’s Geode processors are being used in the One Laptop Per Child design.