AMD this summer established a new chip design team at its Boston Design
Center here as part of a worldwide effort to strengthen its ability to deliver
new processors and boost its sales. AMD now has five PC and server processor
design teams of varying sizes. A sixth team works on non-PC chips, such as the
Geode for set-top boxes and industrial handhelds. The three newest teams were
all established this summer, including the engineers in Boxborough, India
Engineering Center in Bangalore and a team focusing on mobile processors at the
AMD Japan Engineering Lab in Tokyo. Their efforts are being coupled with work
done by existing design groups at the company’s headquarters in Sunnyvale,
Calif., and in Austin, Texas.

The Massachusetts team has expertise in several areas, including multicore
chips, which pack two or more processor cores into a single piece of silicon,
and low-power processors that make them ideal for notebook PCs and servers. AMD
is also working on adding more features to its chips to improve computers’
performance or make them more secure. One, code-named Pacifica, is intended to
help processors work well with software intended for virtualization, or
partitioning a computer to help it run different programs simultaneously.
Another, code-named Presidio, is focused on security.

AMD this summer established a new chip design team at its Boston Design
Center here as part of a worldwide effort to strengthen its ability to deliver
new processors and boost its sales. AMD now has five PC and server processor
design teams of varying sizes. A sixth team works on non-PC chips, such as the
Geode for set-top boxes and industrial handhelds. The three newest teams were
all established this summer, including the engineers in Boxborough, India
Engineering Center in Bangalore and a team focusing on mobile processors at the
AMD Japan Engineering Lab in Tokyo. Their efforts are being coupled with work
done by existing design groups at the company’s headquarters in Sunnyvale,
Calif., and in Austin, Texas.

The Massachusetts team has expertise in several areas, including multicore
chips, which pack two or more processor cores into a single piece of silicon,
and low-power processors that make them ideal for notebook PCs and servers. AMD
is also working on adding more features to its chips to improve computers’
performance or make them more secure. One, code-named Pacifica, is intended to
help processors work well with software intended for virtualization, or
partitioning a computer to help it run different programs simultaneously.
Another, code-named Presidio, is focused on security.