AMD will detail its “Pacifica” virtualization technology by the end of this month, enabling software companies to start working with the feature, which makes it easier for a computer to run several operating systems simultaneously. The Pacifica technology is scheduled to arrive in processors in 2006, later than the comparable Vanderpool technology–now officially called Intel Virtualization Technology–that is promised to appear this year in Intel chips. What’s not clear is whether the two technologies will be compatible, raising the prospect of complications for some software makers. AMD hinted that Pacifica may vary from Vanderpool. It’s architecturally very similar to Vanderpool, though it does offer a different feature set and differing implementation, all designed to provide a richer environment for hypervisor-based virtualization.

AMD will detail its “Pacifica” virtualization technology by the end of this month, enabling software companies to start working with the feature, which makes it easier for a computer to run several operating systems simultaneously. The Pacifica technology is scheduled to arrive in processors in 2006, later than the comparable Vanderpool technology–now officially called Intel Virtualization Technology–that is promised to appear this year in Intel chips. What’s not clear is whether the two technologies will be compatible, raising the prospect of complications for some software makers. AMD hinted that Pacifica may vary from Vanderpool. It’s architecturally very similar to Vanderpool, though it does offer a different feature set and differing implementation, all designed to provide a richer environment for hypervisor-based virtualization.