AMD is on track at releasing their top-of-the-line Phenom II X6 1090T CPU. We bring you the performance numbers in a six-way CPU comparison, featuring guest appearance by AMD’s own Phenom II X2…or is it X4?

 

Earlier in March this year, AMD announced that it would bring forward the release date of their flagship “Thuban” six core processor. The AMD Phenom II X6 1090T as it is called, exists in a 938 pin AM3 package, stays within a 125W Thermal Design Power (TDP) specification, and is clocked at 3.2GHz with 9MB of total cache.

The “T” in the model name denotes “Turbo CORE Technology” support on the processor. Like Intel’s Turbo Boost Technology, the aim is to achieve higher clockspeeds to benefit less threaded applications while staying within specified thermal and power envelopes. In AMD’s implementation, Turbo CORE kicks in for a n-core CPU when n/2 or less processor cores are loaded. For the Phenom II X6 1090T we’re testing today, the maximal Turbo CORE frequency is capped at 3.6GHz (i.e. an additional CPU multiplier of two over the rated 16X). 

Like the “Deneb” and “Heka” processors before it, “Thuban” uses a Dual Channel DDR3 1333MHz Integrated Memory Controller (IMC), and is built on the 45nm process. The Phenom II CPU is intended to be used on AMD 890FX/GX + SB850 mainboards to form the “Leo” enthusiast platform. For the year of 2010, “Leo” will be AMD’s Highend Desktop (HEDT) offering.

The Phenom II X6 1090T which we have on hand is a Week 10 unit, and we’ve been living with it for nearly two weeks now. Midway through our testing, we received a mainboard BIOS update that measurably improved system performance for our AMD test setup, prompting us to reassess our test systems completely, all over again. This is the prime reason why VR-Zone.com didn’t have a AMD Phenom X6 1090T review on the very day that embargo was lifted. We’d like to thank you readers for checking back, but sorry for being so late! 

While we ain’t the first, we know deep in our hearts that the very least we’ve done, is to make the performance figures you see in the following pages, much more accurate.