AMD’s new flagship series – the Phenom II X6 1000T – is here. The build up has been covered rather extensively, and it is one of those releases where there are no major surprises. AMD is releasing two Phenom II X6 CPUs now – the 1090T BE and the 1055T – with the 1035T following shortly and the 1075T in Q3. Thuban with two cores disabled, Zosma, or the Phenom II X6 900T will release in Q3 as well with the 960T.

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AMD’s new flagship series – the Phenom II X6 1000T – is here. The build
up has been covered rather extensively, and it is one of those releases
where there are no major surprises. AMD is releasing two Phenom II X6
CPUs now – the 1090T BE and the 1055T – with the 1035T following shortly
and the 1075T in Q3. Thuban with two cores disabled, Zosma, or the
Phenom II X6 900T will release in Q3 as well with the 960T.

It is clear that AMD is positioning the 1090T BE against Intel’s Core i7 860 at $285, and the 1055T against the Core i5 750 at $200. Straight off the bat, AMD has both a 50% core count advantage and a slight clock speed advantage. Unfortunately, the Lynnfield CPUs have a superb turbo boost, and far superior IPC. Hence, in applications that use between one and four threads, the Intel CPUs come out on top. Thus, for applications like gaming, it is clear that Intel’s CPUs provide the best option. Having said that, games are mostly GPU limited, so the gap between the Phenom II and the Core CPUs isn’t as much.

As expected, it is in the multi-threaded applications that the Phenom II X6 perform admirably. The Core i5 750, handicapped by a lack of Hyperthreading, falls behind, and in some applications even the 1055T outperforms the i7 860. The 1090T BE dominates all Intel products below the $500 price range. If you are into media or content creation – Phenom II X6 seems like the perfect product.

AMD can’t match Intel’s power consumption, but the X6 CPUs perform surprisingly well compared to their X4 brothers.

The Core i7 980X plays in a different level altogether – and it simply steamrolls over AMD’s six-core alternative. However, they are not competing against each other at all – the 980X being priced 5 times as much as the 1055T.

In the end, whether the Phenom II X6 is the product for you depends on your use. Hardcore gamers will no doubt look towards Intel. For video editors, or media freaks, AMD’s option is the best. As for mixed users – the Phenom II X6 remains worth considering. Is the performance hit in less threaded applications such as games worth it as a trade off to the performance gain in multi threaded apps such as media encoding? Of course, you will need to ask yourself this question and choose the CPU that works best. AMD and Intel both have stellar products under $300, with their own advantages and drawbacks.

The Phenom II X6 is the last major AMD desktop CPU product till Llano hits in early 2011. AMD’s Bulldozer architecture has been years in the making, and should finally surface in the form of Zambezi some time in 2011.

Here’s a list of Phenom II X6 reviews compiled by our forum member adrianlee, for your reference.