Analysts like Apples WWDC unveil, but disappointed there was not more

Analysts have responded predominantly positively to Apple's new software and hardware lineup unveiled at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in Moscone West, San Francisco, but the lack of surprises has caused some concerns.

Analysts have responded predominantly positively to Apple's new software and hardware lineup unveiled at the Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in Moscone West, San Francisco, but the lack of surprises has caused some concerns.

 
Philip Elmer-Dewitt at Fortune collected a number of analyst comments on Apple's keynote address, with the majority of them praising the new features of iOS, but many expressing disappointment at the lack of hardware launches.
 
Bill Shope from Goldman Sachs said that the addition of Siri for the new iPad will help with the momentum it expects to continue this quarter, while FaceTime running over a mobile connection will strengthen Apple's platform against rivals on the market. He expressed scepticism about Apple's need to develop its own Maps app, but said that Siri integration will help with competitiveness.
 
Mark Moskowitz from J.P. Morgan noted three key software-driven services in Apple's announcement: Passbook, Maps and FaceTime over a mobile network. He believes this will strengthen things for the iPhone 5 launch, with Passbook considered a precusor to a mobile payment service from Apple that the financial firm calls “iPay.”
 
 Analysts like Apples WWDC unveil, but disappointed there was not more
 
Gene Munster from Piper Jaffray commented on Apple's move to “meaningfully differentiate iOS from Android.” It said the partnership with Facebook makes the iPhone the de-facto Facebook phone and Google is unlikely to have a similar partnership. He expects Apple to ink deals with other firms in order to further get rid of Google's presence on the iPhone.
 
Chris Whitmore from Deutsche Bank praised the increasing “stickiness” of the iOS and Mac platforms, but indicated that the announcements were in-line with expectations. 
 
Ben Reitzes from Barclay said that software was ahead of expectations, but he was surprised not to see Apple introduce the ability to make apps for Apple TV. He was also disappointed by the lack of hardware products, and he said investors “likely expected more.” 
 
Alex Gauna at JMP said the software was as forecast, but said the lack of surprises caused stocks to fall, with particular disappointment about the lack of Apple TV announcements.
 
The general consensus is that what Apple delivered is good, but more was expected or desired, which leads to the question if “good” is good enough. This is the first WWDC since the passing of Apple co-founder and former CEO Steve Jobs – and it shows.
 
Source: Fortune