The latest figures on global smartphone shipments reconfirm Android’s dominance with almost 80 percent share, with iOS and Windows Phone trailing far behind. 

android ios windows 580 75 Android smartphone shipments up to 79.5% in Q2 2013, iOS drops down to 13.6%

In the United States, Android and iOS are almost neck and neck in market share (based on sales), but how are the top two mobile operating systems doing globally? According to Strategy Analytics’ figures, Android reached an all-time high of 79.5 percent of all smartphone shipments in the last twelve months, while iOS hit its lowest level since Q2 2010 with shipments down to 13.6 percent.

Android’s whopping 10 percent growth was driven by many factors, such as strong demand at basically all price levels in both developed and developing markets (markets like India and China contributed heavily with a plethora of home-grown Android phones enticing consumers with attractive price vs. spec ratios), competitive licensing costs, and numerous hardware partners. Android now powers 8 in every 10 smartphones sold on the planet, an impressive achievement any way you look at it.

smartphones q2 2013 sa 730x220 Android smartphone shipments up to 79.5% in Q2 2013, iOS drops down to 13.6%

Microsoft reached its highest level in the global smartphone market since three years ago, mainly due to the huge push by Nokia. But Microsoft needs to change its licensing fees and bring out support for hardware “such as octo-core chipsets” faster if they truly want Windows Phone to take off, according to Strategy Analytics. The company’s position in third place in the smartphone wars is not to be doubted any more, even with a low 3.9 percent share, but there’s decidedly a long way to go for the folks over at Redmond.

Other smartphone OS accounted for just 3 percent of smartphone shipments, which effectively makes this a three-horse race that probably won’t be able to find room for another player, and we’ll keep a keen eye on upcoming OS such as Ubuntu Phone, Tizen, and Sailfish to see where they’re able to fit in.

Via: The Next Web | Source: Strategy Analysts