apple epeat Apple admits mistake, returns to EPEAT green registry

Apple has admitted that it was a mistake to remove its products from the EPEAT green rating system and announced that all eligible Apple products are back on the registry.

Apple has admitted that it was a mistake to remove its products from the EPEAT green rating system and announced that all eligible Apple products are back on the registry.

 
“We’ve recently heard from many loyal Apple customers who were disappointed to learn that we had removed our products from the EPEAT rating system,” said Bob Mansfield, SVP of Hardware Engineering at Apple. “I recognize that this was a mistake.”
 
He tried to defend Apple's green reputation and commitment to protecting the environment, saying it is “as strong as ever” and citing several examples of where Apple is an industry leader in removing toxins like brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), using recyclable materials in place of plastics where possible, and reporting in detail on greenhouse gas emissions for all of its products.
 
Mansfield also lauded Apple's energy-efficiency, claiming all of its products exceed the ENERGY STAR 5.2 government standard. He took a pot shot at EPEAT by criticising the IEEE 1680.1 standard on which it is based, claiming it could be improved by including environmental protection advancements from the ENERGY STAR standard.
 
apple epeat Apple admits mistake, returns to EPEAT green registry
 
Robert Frisbee, CEO of EPEAT, welcomed Apple's change of heart, thanking the share-holders for their support and welcoming Apple's “strong and creative thoughts on ongoing standards development.”
 
Apple said its relationship with EPEAT “has become stronger as a result of this experience,” though it boggles the mind how exactly pulling out of something and then returning to it after widespread complaints leads to a better partnership.
 
The company faced widespread criticism after it pulled out of EPEAT earlier this month, with Greenpeace challenging Apple's environmental record and the City of San Francisco refusing to buy any Mac products unless Apple returned to the EPEAT programme. 
 
We expect the threat of lower sales and the loss of a number of government contracts, many of which require EPEAT certification, played a large role in Apple's embarrassing u-turn.