Apple is notorious for cherishing its hefty profit margins more than anything and for crafty marketing that allows it to pretty much sell ice to Eskimos, so it shouldn’t come as a shocker Cupertino’s Black Friday 2013 deals are fairly modest.

iPad Air Apple Black Friday deals go live in Australia, consist of gift cards, not actual discounts

Oh, let’s not beat it around the bush, they’re pathetic. More so than even last year’s BF promos. Granted, at the time of this writing Apple’s Australian online store is the only one to have confirmed them, but don’t you dare dream, they’ll be identical when landing stateside.

Technically, the savings aren’t so paltry. In fact, they’re more generous than back in 2012 – for example, $140 on a Mac vs. $100. The problem is you’re not looking at actual price cuts. You know, as in the Macs were one price yesterday and tomorrow they’ll be $100 cheaper.

Instead, the prices are all the same, only you get gift cards with certain purchases that can be used for subsequent shopping. But what if you just want to buy one single iDevice? That’s exactly what Apple’s counting on.

Apple Black Friday1 Apple Black Friday deals go live in Australia, consist of gift cards, not actual discounts

Even worse, iPhones and Retina iPad minis aren’t part of the Black Friday promotion, a clear sign of still steady demand or solid trust in their abilities to top plenty of holiday shopping lists sans help. Or both.

At the end of the day, Macs are sold with $137 (AUS $ 150) gift cards, the iPad Air, iPad 2 and non-Retina mini net you $68 (AUS $75) for future purchases, and iPods $45 (AUS $50). The figures are likely to slightly differ in the US, but again, on the whole, don’t expect to be treated any differently.

A friendly advice before wrapping up. If you’re in the market for a Mac, iPad or iPod and think these “deals” unworthy of attention, look towards Best Buy, Walmart, Target, Amazon or Newegg. Someone will surely have you covered with something better.

Source: 9 To 5 Mac