Apple delays German sales ban of iPhone and iPad ranges

Apple has delayed a sales ban of its iPhone and iPad ranges in Germany, which could help it avoid a disastrous drop in sales in the largest European economy.

Apple has delayed a sales ban of its iPhone and iPad ranges in Germany, which could help it avoid a disastrous drop in sales in the largest European economy.

 
Motorola Mobility, which Google is awaiting approval to buy, secured the sales ban in December after the Karlsruhe Higher Regional Court ruled that Apple had infringed its patents.
 
Apple managed to secure a last minute temporary suspension of the sales ban, however, which will ensure its products remain on sale for at least another few days or weeks. Apple claims that Motorola won't license the patent in question to it, but Motorola claims that the two disagree over payment terms for Apple's unauthorised use of the patent in the past.
 
Despite Apple's efforts, Motorola is continuing to push for a sales ban, saying that the court recognises that Apple infringed its patents and that the suspension is therefore only a temporary waiver before the products need to be taken off the shelves.
 
 Apple delays German sales ban of iPhone and iPad ranges
 
Now that the tables are turning on Apple, we wonder if it regrets beginning this latest patent war with Android smartphone makers. It previously secured a sales ban of the Samsung Galaxy Tab in Germany and has been fighting for similar bans in other countries across the world. It has also launched cases against HTC and Motorola.
 
The products that face a ban include the iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, and iPhone 4, as well as all 3G models of the iPad. The iPhone 4S and Wi-Fi versions of the iPad are not affected.
 
Apple also faces another problem in that Motorola has secured a ruling against the infringement of another of its patents relating to two-way communications between pagers and other devices. This affects Apple's iCloud and MobileMe products, but Apple claims that the patent is invalid and is appealing the decision.
 
Source: BBC