Screen Shot 2012 07 03 at 9 06 08 AM 520x338 Apple granted patent for peripheral treatment for head mounted displays

Google’s Project Glass, thus far, has amounted to essentially a camera mounted eye glass, and the possibility of making personal computing available anytime and anywhere seems out of reach.  While Google is hacking away at trying to make their augmented reality glasses a reality, Apple has been tampering with the notion of computing through head-mounted-displays.

Google’s Project Glass, thus far, has amounted to essentially a camera mounted eye glass, and the possibility of making personal computing available anytime and anywhere seems out of reach.  While Google is hacking away at trying to make their augmented reality glasses a reality, Apple has been tampering with the notion of computing through head-mounted-displays. 

Screen Shot 2012 07 03 at 9 06 08 AM 520x338(1) Apple granted patent for peripheral treatment for head mounted displays

A patent granted to Apple today outlined some key features that reveal Apple may be on a collision course with Google in the future.  The patent entitled “Peripheral treatment for head-mounted displays” discusses the techniques for projecting an image into someone’s eyes through the use of head-mounted-displays. 

The Abstract section states:

“Methods and apparatus, including computer program products, implementing and using techniques for projecting a source image in a head-mounted display apparatus for a user. A first display projects an image viewable by a first eye of the user. A first peripheral light element is positioned to emit light of one or more colors in close proximity to the periphery of the first display. A receives data representing a source image, processes the data representing the source image to generate a first image for the first display and to generate a first set of peripheral conditioning signals for the first peripheral light element, directs the first image to the first display, and directs the first set of peripheral conditioning signals to the first peripheral light element. As a result, an enhanced viewing experience is created for the user.”

Screen Shot 2012 07 03 at 9 06 36 AM Apple granted patent for peripheral treatment for head mounted displays

Basically, an image will be projected onto someone’s eye via LCD screens, and to fill in the gaps of a user’s peripheral vision, the patent include “mechanisms” for coverage of a person’s entire field of vision.  The distinction between Apple’s head-mounted device and Google’s is that Google’s Glass won’t cover all of a person’s field of vision.

willy wonka braces 7188 7188 Apple granted patent for peripheral treatment for head mounted displays

Promising news for tech junkies, but will Apple make a head-mounted device that appeals to the masses—will it be attractive to wear in public?  Or will it be a hideous contraption? 

Source: uspto.gov via thenextweb.com