Apple has refused to fix the Do Not Disturb bug that has plagued iPhones since the turn of the year, suggesting users simply wait it out until the feature returns to normal next week.

Apple has refused to fix the Do Not Disturb bug that has plagued iPhones since the turn of the year, suggesting users simply wait it out until the feature returns to normal next week.

 
When users set up Do Not Disturb the phone will no longer ring during a specified time period or for certain callers, helping people get a good night sleep while still allowing for certain emergency calls from pre-defined people.
 
A bug in iOS, however, means that the feature does not switch off after its scheduled end time, potentially resulting in missing important calls and notifications.
 
Apple's suggested workaround is to manually turn the feature on or off until 7 January, when the bug will resolve itself. Patrick McCarron, a developer for iOS, suggested the problem was created by incorrectly formatting dates on the platform, leading to it thinking the New Year begins a week into January.
 
Given the problem will go away of its own accord, it is not surprising that Apple is not bothering to issue a software fix, but that still means several more days of a glitchy feature for many users, some of whom might have been hoping for a patch this week.
 
 
Apple is no stranger to date and time related problems, regularly suffering from bugs related to the daylight savings time zone switch, which resulted in many people not being up on time for work. Users might be hoping this latest bug is patched before we ring in 2014, but past experience suggests time just really is not on Apple's side.
 
Gary Calcott, technical marketing manager at Progress Software, criticised Apple's approach to this issue:
 
"The recent glitches in Apple's iOS applications have been well publicised, and the latest fault with its 'Do Not Disturb' application is the latest in a number of high profile issues it has experienced. However, the most important lesson to take from this is the importance of treating mobile applications as business critical applications, and offering a rigorous level of testing. The increase in the number of businesses operating a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) policy means that in today's business world, mobile phones are increasingly becoming business tools, which means that it's never been more important for them, and the applications they run to operate correctly.
 
"Imagine, for instance, material planning transactions that were unable to work correctly until January 7th – it's highly unlikely that such a scenario would take place. Perhaps developers need to start viewing mobile applications not as value-add services for consumers, but as business critical tools for businesses, with the same amount of rigour put into testing as you'd expect from this kind of application?"
 
To make matters worse, Apple aired a video showing off the Do Not Disturb feature on 1 January, right when it stopped working properly. It just cannot get the hang of proper timing, it seems.
 

Source: The Telegraph