app store logo Apple yanks Sonys e book reader app from App Store over transaction issues

It is a well known fact that the Cupertino electronics giant pulls no punches when it comes to exercising control over its software and hardware ecosystem. And unfortunately for Sony, the Japanese electronics company is the next to find out that dealing with Apple is not exactly the most smooth sailing of affairs, especially after having its e-book reader app axed by the latter over payment method issues.

sony logo Apple yanks Sonys e book reader app from App Store over transaction issues

Remember what were some of Apple's plans when it first announced the launch of its iPad tablet device? Most may not be able to remember every single detail, but it should be public knowledge that the Cupertino company is keen to gain a foothold in the e-book market, and needless to say Apple is not in it for charity. After all, that can be the only reason why Apple insists on a 30 percent cut on any e-books sold on its iTunes App Store.

And unfortunately for Sony, it appears that Apple's stand on mandating that any e-book reading applications placed in its App Store use its own payment system has no room for negotiatiation. Apparently, the Japanese electronics giant's e-reader app has been axed from the App Store for a very simple reason: failing to play nice with Apple's rules.

According to a report by The Japan Times Online, Sony's e-reader app had reportedly struck a nerve with the staff who manage the iTunes App Store over Apple's purchasing requirements. Few details have been officially announced, but Japan Time Online claims that Sony's e-reader app was pulled over an allegedly violation of the App Store's regulations by making use of its own payment methods as opposed to the official, Apple-sanctioned system. By doing so, Sony is supposedly able to bypass the 30-percent cut of profits which the Cupertino company demands, and needless to say this act did not go down well with Apple.

Of course, such decision often have both parties pointing the fingers at each other as to who should be held responsible for the axing of an app in the iTunes App Store. At least, Sony claims that it had done nothing wrong to warrant its app being yanked from the App Store, and that Apple was the one at fault for silently changing its methods of enforcing developer guidelines. On the other hand, Apple insists that Sony knowingly flouted its developer regulations, and that it had not made any modifications to the way apps and e-books are supposed to be purchased on its App Store.

Either way, it does not change the fact that Apple is unlikely to re-host Sony's e-reader application up on its App Store until Sony rectifies the error. However, current consumers may take some comfort in the knowledge that e-books purchased from Sony's Reader Store are not tied to any specific platform and may be viewed on a variety of devices, such as Android-powered smartphones and Sony's Reader.

Source: The Japan Times Online