EarPod Case Pulp Apples packaging   Aqua degradable

Apple may have revoked its green certification some time ago after asking EPEAT (Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool) to remove all of its products from the green registry, however, they have a new form of packing technology that is biodegradable before your eyes – with some warm water.

Recently, Apple has claimed that their latest packaging for some newly released products are water dissoluble.  So far, a portion of the new Fifth-Generation iPod Touch and Seventh Generation iPod Nano‘s packaging, being millions of products, are biodegradable.

Long being a leader in package and product design and, often previously claiming how green friendly their products are, this will surely appeal more to their customers in their undertaking of environmental responsibility, when they can watch the packaging disolve in warm water for themselves.

According to Apple's website, the material is made from a form of “…renewable tapioca paper foam material…”, which is completely recyclable pulp when it breaks down in warm water.  Also, Apple claims that they are dedicated to re-engineering recycled material in more core components of their designs such as "… our fan assemblies use advanced materials derived from repolymerized plastic bottles.".

In addition to reducing waste, Apple also wants to limit toxic substances normally used in other parts of the industry: "Not only is every product we sell free of BFRs and other harmful toxins, we have also qualified thousands of components to be free of elemental bromine and chlorine, putting us years ahead of anyone else in the industry."  Some examples of components which Apple wants to reduce toxicity in include mercury-free LED backlighting and arsenic-free glass

A worker at a Foxconn plant in China has been quoted in the news recently as saying that the fumes in production and excessive exposure are a problem, however. 

Considering the other recent debacles in the media of late, these facts are surely a breath of image 'fresh air' for Apple.