2004

2007

2010

2013
Black Diamond
(k value of 3, 90nm)
Black Diamond II
(k value of 2.2-2.4, 65nm)
Black Diamond III?
45nm
Black Diamond IV?
32nm

Applied Materials outlined its roadmap in what it calls the
"Low k Era" of semiconductor manufacturing. Under the plan, Applied hopes to
extend its so-called Black Diamond line of low-k materials down to the 32-nm
node, which is slated for 2013, based on the ITRS roadmap. Applied plans to push
its low-k films with k values down to 2.4 to 2.2, although they claimst he
material can be extended to 1.9. Low k enhances speed gains and offers the
critical advantages of reduced power consumption with lower crosstalk for
heightened performance.

At 65-nm, which is due in 2007, Applied will extend the
current Black Diamond film down to a k value of just below 3. At that time, the
company will introduce what some call Black Diamond II, a next-generation film
for complex chips. The next-generation Black Diamond film is expected to have a
k value of about 2.4 to 2.2. Black Diamond II will be introduced at the 65-nm
node, but the technology can be extended to the 45- and 32-nm nodes, which are
expected in 2010 and 2013. Black Diamond II is in R&D right now. To date, more
than 40 million chips use the Black Diamond film to power the latest mobile
electronics, high-speed game consoles.


2004

2007

2010

2013
Black Diamond
(k value of 3, 90nm)
Black Diamond II
(k value of 2.2-2.4, 65nm)
Black Diamond III?
45nm
Black Diamond IV?
32nm

Applied Materials outlined its roadmap in what it calls the
"Low k Era" of semiconductor manufacturing. Under the plan, Applied hopes to
extend its so-called Black Diamond line of low-k materials down to the 32-nm
node, which is slated for 2013, based on the ITRS roadmap. Applied plans to push
its low-k films with k values down to 2.4 to 2.2, although they claimst he
material can be extended to 1.9. Low k enhances speed gains and offers the
critical advantages of reduced power consumption with lower crosstalk for
heightened performance.

At 65-nm, which is due in 2007, Applied will extend the
current Black Diamond film down to a k value of just below 3. At that time, the
company will introduce what some call Black Diamond II, a next-generation film
for complex chips. The next-generation Black Diamond film is expected to have a
k value of about 2.4 to 2.2. Black Diamond II will be introduced at the 65-nm
node, but the technology can be extended to the 45- and 32-nm nodes, which are
expected in 2010 and 2013. Black Diamond II is in R&D right now. To date, more
than 40 million chips use the Black Diamond film to power the latest mobile
electronics, high-speed game consoles.