Transition from Socket 939 to M2

Many of us technology enthusiasts would have known by now that AMD will be transiting from it’s Socket 939/DDR platform to it’s Socket M2(940pins)/DDR-II platform. This is due to the fact that the Socket 939 platform will not work with DDR-II due to the on die memory controller of the Athlon 64 platform. From the roadmap, the Socket 939 platform will eventually be phased out by the 3rd quarter of this year, and thus everyone will be made to buy DDR-II modules for their new setup soon.

As we all should know by now, the transition from Socket 939 to Socket M2 will yield practically no benefits in the short run, and instead, with the same amount of money, You’ll be getting less performance instead until high speed (>=DDR667, low latency CL3)DDR-II RAMs goes mainstream and become more affordable. A nice article by Anandtech comparing the two platforms will give you guys an insight on the differences between the two platforms. In the tests later, We’ll be conducting the tests using DDR-II CL4 DDR667 RAM for Socket M2 and DDR400 CL2 RAM for the Socket 939 part.

What’s new in the Nforce 5 series

chipset lineup ASUS M2N32 SLI Deluxe Socket AM2 Review

Nvidia has introduced their new line of Nforce 5 chipsets in line with the AM2 CPUs, and unlike the CPUs, the Nforce 5 series does promise some novel features like a Dual Gigabit MACs with teaming, 6 SATA RAID-enabled ports and a patented Nvidia Linkboost Technology. The new Nforce5 chipsets will be made to co-exist with some of the current Nforce 4 chipsets to cover different segments of the market. Following will be elaborations on the changes.

linkboosttech ASUS M2N32 SLI Deluxe Socket AM2 Review

Nvidia’s Linkboost technology will only be present in their top-of-the-line Nforce 590, basically to sum it up it will actually able to boost clocks by up to 25% with additional bandwidth between the GPU and Nvidia’s MCP itself, making the chipset command a premium over the rest of the Nvidia Nforce 5 and 4 family.