The ATI Radeon HD 5770 and the HD 5750 release today, as expected. As a reminder, this is the series based on the mainstream Juniper die.

The HD 5770 features the full 800SP and is basically identical to the HD 4890 in specifications, except for a 128-bit memory interface. Our final memory bandwidth is 77 GB/s, well short of the HD 4890′s 120 GB/s. It is priced at $159.

The HD 5750 is a cut down version of the same Juniper die, featuring 9 of the 10 SIMD units, thus 720 SP / 36 TMU. The 512MB version is priced at $109 and 1GB at $129.

More details next page.


The ATI Radeon HD 5770 and the HD 5750 release today, as expected. As a
reminder, this is the series based on the mainstream Juniper die.

The HD 5770 features the full 800SP and is basically identical to the HD
4890 in specifications, except for a 128-bit memory interface. Our
final memory bandwidth is 77 GB/s, well short of the HD 4890′s 120 GB/s.
It is priced at $159.

The HD 5750 is a cut down version of the same Juniper die, featuring 9
of the 10 SIMD units, thus 720 SP / 36 TMU. The 512MB version is priced
at $109 and 1GB at $129.

Our members have compiled a list of most reviews for the HD 5700 series here.

First, we have the HD 5770. With specifications nearly identical to the HD 4890, we would have expected performance well above the GTX 260 and HD 4870 1GB cards, which are available in the $150 bracket (GTX 260 being a tad more expensive). Sadly, the 128-bit memory interface seems to have been a poor decision by AMD, after all, severely bottlenecking the HD 5770′s processing potential. Instead of mixing it up with the HD 4890 and the GTX 275, it is restricted to trading blows with the GTX 260 and the HD 4870 1GB. Although, it is not as clear cut as that – there is significant variation between the separate reviews and benchmarks. Overall, it does seem the HD 5770 ends up just shy of the GTX 260 and the HD 4870 1GB. With certain HD 4870 1GB available as low as $140, it clearly offers the best price/performance ratio in this segment. However, the HD 5770 does have DirectX11 support. Furthermore, the power consumption is simply outstanding – saving considerably on any product in the >$100 range. It does run cool and quiet, thanks to the much smaller die, at 166 m2. If you are buying your GPU for the long haul, even with the lower price/performance ratio than the HD 4870, the HD 5770 makes more senes. If, however, you plan to change your GPU within a few months and are looking for a short term solution, our money is in the HD 4870 1GB.

The HD 5750, however, shines outright. Despite a significant gap in theoretical processing power to the HD 5770, the HD 5750 performs much closer than it should be. As a result, the HD 5750 is a solid competitor to both the GTS 250 and the HD 4850 on performance. It has far better thermal characteristics than both, boasts of the greater feature set and the 512MB version ends up at $109, well south of the average $125 for the GTS 250. The 1GB variant is available at $129. However, provided you are not gaming at a resolution higher than 1680×1050 – in which case you should probably look out for the HD 5800 series – the performance delta should be minimal. Things get complicated as there are certain bargain HD 4850 512MB cards available for under $100. However, the extra features and better thermals just about makes up for it. At $109, the HD 5750 is a winner.

We had strong expectations from the HD 5700 series, and we have to be somewhat disappointed by the HD 5770. It offers stellar performance, all the latest features, but its price does appear high when compared with the HD 4870 1GB. There are already reports that we can expect a price cut to $140, in which case the HD 5770 will be the best choice outright. The HD 5750, on the other hand, comes recommended without reservations.

The release of the HD 5700 has once again shaken up the mainstream segment, but there’s still the ~$200 market to address. The HD 4890 and GTX 275 are for the most part faster than the HD 5770, and consumers will find reason to go for those cards. Given the fairly large gap between the $159 HD 5770 and the $259 HD 5850, which would get even bigger if the rumoured price cuts hold, could we expect a HD 5830 in the ~$200 range any time soon? It would make sense, and maybe that is the 14 SIMD part everyone was talking about.

Next in line is the dual-Cypress monster, Hemlock, rumoured to be branded as the HD 5800 X2 series. Release is set for late-October.