While cheap Android knock-offs might still be frowned upon in the West, over in China they seem to not only be tolerated better, but grow in popularity by the day. And it’s no wonder, given they’re also consistently improving in terms of build quality and specs.

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Take the newest HTC One clone. Scored by the folks over at Engadget on the streets of Huaqiangbei, this no-name replica is really one of the first ever that we’ve seen living up to the “clone” name. And that’s also counting all the iPhone 4, 4S or 5 knock-offs, plus the increasing number of Samsung Galaxy lookalikes.

The level of detail at which the HTC One’s design has been copied is almost outrageous, with essentially the only big tell being the back is constructed of plastic. Meanwhile, I’m sure you all know the original One rocks an all-metal body.

Some smaller tells are the slightly bigger speaker grill holes on the One clone and the logo on the front, which has been painted on top of the glass rather than beneath it. But let’s be frank, how many of us would ever notice those things or be bothered by them?

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Meanwhile, as far as specs and features go, the knock-off is clearly inferior to its idol, but far from a low-end device. The 4.7-inch display boasts a 1,280 x 720 pixels resolution, the processor is a quad-core MediaTek unit, you get 16 GB of on-board storage (sadly with no microSD support), an 8 MP (not UltraPixel) rear cam, Android 4.2 Jelly Bean (sans Sense UI or other customizations) and non-removable 1,600 mAh battery.

And how much do you think it all costs? Yuan 1,300, or $210. Now, it is true that underneath all the apparent premium design elements some dark secrets may hide. And that the build quality could be shoddy after all. Also, clones in general are tacky and tasteless. But darn if I wouldn’t consider getting one of these things if I were to find them at my local Best Buy or via retailers like Amazon! Wouldn’t you?

Via [Engadget]