Microsoft and Twitter have renewed a deal to include tweets in Bing search results, both through the social search and on the main search.

Bing logo orange RGB 1024x393 Bing, Twitter renew deal to display tweets in search results

Twitter has signed a deal with Microsoft to renew access to the Twitter firehose, which is the entirety of tweets on the social network. With the deal, Bing will display Tweets as part of search results when users specifically do a social search (bing.com/social). In addition, tweets will also appear on the main search results whenever relevant.

Techcrunch highlights how this underscores a big difference between Bing and Google. Whereas Google search focuses on factors like keyword relevance and authority, Bing also includes social factors in its algorithm.

Additionally, Microsoft shared with the technology blog that the agreement is a renewal of a deal previously made with Twitter, and that this go on indefinitely.

“The past four years partnering with Twitter have been great, and we’re excited to continue that relationship in order to help deliver the best possible search experience,” said a representative.

Only public tweets will be available in search results, and Twitter does not share information on protected tweets or private direct messages. According to Microsoft, the main purpose of enabling access to tweets is to provide “near real-time access to what people are tweeting tailored to what you’re searching for.”

Bing enjoys a 17.9 percent market share as of Q3 2013, compared with Google’s 67 percent. Bing’s market share is reportedly growing, however, and Microsoft has partnered with the likes of Yahoo! in providing access to its search technology. Bing also powers searches from Windows Phone, Internet Explorer and other Microsoft products by default.

Meanwhile, Twitter is gearing up for its upcoming initial public offering (IPO), and is ensuring relevance across several verticals, including advertising and brand marketing, in partnership with several companies.

Sources: Bing, TechCrunch