BlackBerry Curve 9920 BlackBerry Curve 9220 Launches in India   Foreign Market May Provide New Hope for RIM

Research In Motion (RIM), the maker of BlackBerry phones, is a dying company. Even markets once reliable to RIM are no longer an assumed asset to them. However, the launch of a new Blackberry in India shows that the company might be looking overseas for a fighting chance – and might just get it.

BlackBerry Curve 9920 BlackBerry Curve 9220 Launches in India   Foreign Market May Provide New Hope for RIM

Research In Motion (RIM), the maker of BlackBerry phones, is a dying company. Even markets once reliable to RIM are no longer an assumed asset to them. However, the launch of a new Blackberry in India shows that the company might be looking overseas for a fighting chance – and might just get it.
 
The way it looks now, RIM has a pretty bleak future in the United States. According to analysis firm Ovum, the usage of Blackberries in MDM – mobile device management – has dropped to twenty-four percent, opposed the Apple iPhone’s forty percent. Statistics look even bleaker for Blackberry’s use among field technicians, which dropped to seven percent during the second quarter, according to an April 17 OnForce Confidence Index report.
 
But Adam Leach, Principal Analyst at Ovum suggests that RIM’s current failure may not be replicated overseas. RIM’s Curve 9220 was released in India on Wednesday. An RIM spokeswoman said the company would also be released in Indonesia, one of RIM’s most profitable markets. A low end phone, the Curve would not impress any Blackberry fans in the U.S. According to Leach, however “Their success in Indonesia shows they have other attributes and capabilities in the BlackBerry platform globally that appeal to different markets rather than just the high-end, mature markets (like North America and Western Europe).” 
 
According to Leach, RIM’s strength is in their ability to offer low end phones of higher quality experience than equivalent Android devices. RIM’s new CEO has announced a plan to turn around the company domestically, but analysts worry about how slowly this is occurring. The Blackberry 10 platform, which RIM hopes will revive interest with U.S companies and business users, will arrive in this year’s fourth quarter, at the earliest. 
 
Abroad, however, RIM has already experienced some success, citing that forty-eight percent of 2010’s fiscal fourth-quarter revenue had come from countries outside of North America. While the issue is a complex one, especially considering the impoverished conditions of Indonesia and other potentially launches countries, these new launches may be a catalysts of new hope for RIM.
 
Reference: Mercury News