a aaa Blizzard Logo Blizzard adds itself to growing list of non Windows 8 supporters

Microsoft’s next operating system is getting a lot of heat from software developers and OEMs. The list of disgruntled partners and developers seems to be growing ever so quickly.  Blizzard executive vice president, Rob Pardo, recently added his company to the growing list of companies that aren’t too excited about Windows 8.

Microsoft’s next operating system is getting a lot of heat from software developers and OEMs. The list of disgruntled partners and developers seems to be growing ever so quickly.  Blizzard executive vice president, Rob Pardo, recently added his company to the growing list of companies that aren’t too excited about Windows 8. 

Pardo wrote on his Twitter earlier this week:

“I think Windows 8 is a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space—not awesome for Blizzard either.”

Valve’s co-founder and managing director, Gabe Newell, also denounced Windows 8 recently in an interview with All Things D.

“I think Windows 8 is a catastrophe for everyone in the PC space. I think we’ll lose some of the top-tier PC/OEMs, who will exit the market. I think margins will be destroyed for a bunch of people. If that’s true, then it will be good to have alternatives to hedge against that eventuality,” Newell said. 

Valve and Blizzard are both involved in the PC space through gaming development and distribution, and up until now, no other PC platforms even come close to having as many supported video games as Windows. 

Competing OS such as Linux and Apple’s OSX don’t have the kind of presence that Windows has in the gaming scene. 

According to Newell, “People don’t realize how critical games are in driving consumer purchasing behavior.”  Which is why Linux, among others, has failed to garner more users.

HP announced that it would not launch a Windows RT tablet alongside Microsoft’s Surface, which was possibly HP’s way of showing that it was not happy with Microsoft trying to compete with partnering OEMs.  Now imagine if Blizzard and Valve do not develop and distribute games for future Windows platforms, what will happen to Microsoft’s presence in the PC space?  Tag on the possibility that less OEMs will partner with Microsoft to build different types of Windows machines at various prices, and Windows is looking at becoming a desktop OS that will have less supported video games like the current Mac OSX platform.

If Newell’s assumption about the significance of gaming holds true for consumers, then Microsoft will lose a lot of users.  If more game developers and distributors begin to voice their dissatisfaction with Windows 8, then that may be a sign that Microsoft’s next OS is heading in the wrong direction.

As of this moment, Windows 8 doesn’t seem like it has a distinct direction in the immense PC space.  Is it a tablet platform with end-to-end control like the iPad’s iOS?  Or is it a desktop OS that will help Microsoft maintain desktop supremacy?

OEMs are unhappy, developers are unhappy, but for now we don’t know whether or not consumers will reject Windows 8.  October 26 marks the debut of Microsoft’s next-gen OS.  Lets see if Microsoft is trying to bite off more than it can chew.