diablo3rmah(1) Blizzard launches Diablo 3 real money auction house

Blizzard has launched its real-money auction house for Diablo III in the Americas, with players able to buy and sell loot in-game with real US dollars, Australian dollars, and Mexican pesos.

Blizzard has launched its real-money auction house for Diablo III in the Americas, with players able to buy and sell loot in-game with real US dollars, Australian dollars, and Mexican pesos.

 
The feature, which was delayed from the original Diablo III launch, adds a deeper economic element to the game that goes well beyond the normal auction house and makes gold-farming, the traditional bane of online games for years, a potentially lucrative affair for both players and Blizzard itself.
 
Some players are unhappy with the idea, which they consider a “pay to win” scenario, since gamers can simply buy good gear with their hard-earned cash instead of earning it in game, while others who like to grind have touted it as a nice way to make some extra cash.
 
The problem with the system is that items are going for extraordinarily high prices, with many on sale for the maximum price of $250, several times more than the cost of the game itself. While obviously the vast majority of these will never sell, the system would not be in place if at least someone out there, rich or insane, did not buy items with real world cash.
 
real money sell fees Blizzard launches Diablo 3 real money auction house
 
The ever-crafty Blizzard has learned from years of experience with World of Warcraft, where it has banned players for farming gold and then selling it for real money on various websites, many of which are advertised by spammers in game. Blizzard's solution for Diablo III was to effectively hire these gold farmers by legalising the concept, with Blizzard getting a nice 15 percent cut of the profits.
 
The company has implemented tight security on this feature, requiring that all participating players have an authenticator, which is very understandable, though some have criticised the requirement, as they believe it forces them to dish out additional funds. Users can, however, employ a mobile authenticator. A Battle.net SMS Protect service, which requires users to enter codes sent to their mobile phone, will also be employed for anyone using PayPal as a payment method.
 
European players have to wait another while before getting access to the real-money auction house, which is restricted by region. Players wanting to use the Chilean peso, Argentine peso and Brazilean real will also have to wait. In-game messages suggest the European launch will be tomorrow, Friday 15 June, so gamers should not have to wait too long before parting with their €250 on an uber digital sword or shield.