gamepop 300x225 Bluestacks puts a price tag on its GamePop Android console

Despite direct competition from the Ouya, Bluestacks is preparing for a winter release of their new console

With the Ouya launching in a few months, one could not possibly foresee a market for two Android-based consoles, but it looks like BlueStacks has stepped up to the plate with GamePop. Originally, the console was a Kickstarter campaign launched in January of this year, taking in over six hundred thousand dollars. Bluestacks far surpassed their original hundred thousand goal to bring the Android-based console  to life which will be released in the winter of 2013.

gamepop2 Bluestacks puts a price tag on its GamePop Android console

While some were able to get the early-bird special of only $69 for the console, an option has finally been opened to the public and will cost $129 for the full console plus a packaged controller.  The console will also offer a $6.99/month subscription service for unlimited access to 500 games on their store. Those who pre-ordered the service for a full year will receive the console and controller for free and anyone who does so before June, will also get the same opportunity.

GamePop already has quite a vast selection of games on their hands, including titles from GluMobile, HalfBrick, Kiloo and FireMint. BlueStacks has stated that half of the subscription revenue will go to developers, but only based on a player usage ratio. This means that it will be “apportioned by usage”, so developers whose games are played more will accumulate more, while less popular titles will pay developers less.

Winter is quite far away, but the Ouya is already setting up for a full retail release on June 25th and will only cost $99.99.  With more than ten thousand developers and some games already on beta machines, BlueStacks will have to pull out all the stops to end up on top. Personally, having used the Ouya previously, GamePop may be offering something better as a service, rather than a competitive console. The Ouya may not be up against heavyweights like the PS4 or Xbox One – especially not graphically – it still will be able to accommodate independent developers who may not be able to show their games off on Steam Greenlight or via walled gardens like Xbox Live Arcade.

via Polygon