m1 Brainwavz M1 & M2 IEM Review
Don’t let these looks fool you like it fooled me

When I first held the M1 in my hands, I found that the cabling is really sturdy and solid. However, it still feels rather flexible and it is really low on microphonics. The plastic housing of the M1 gives a ‘budget’ feel, but then again, this is a real steal looking at the price. The 3.5mm plug of the IEM features a 45-degree connector, as opposed to the typical 90-degree connector or straight-angled connector. I find this quite ergonomic, especially if you put your player in your pocket.

The M1 is really easy to wear for an IEM and it does not require a ‘deep’ seal to get the isolation needed. The isolation is good-enough for daily use, but probably not good enough for recording musicians as I tried to drum with these in my ear.

I wore it throughout a day to see how long I can wear it before it starts to get to me in the comfort department. But even after a few hours have gone and I was done listening to almost all of Muse’s discography, it still felt really comfortable. That’s a real plus.

When it comes to the sound, the M1 really impressed me. At this price range, there are definitely no other IEMs around that give such a positive experience in terms of sound quality. The sound it produces lean towards the warm side but that does not mean it is lacking in the bass department. Bass is not overwhelming, but it packs a little bit more of a punch than average. The mid-range is also similar, sounding mellow and comfortable. But the highs are just not ‘high’ enough. It brings out vocals well, but sometimes you just wish that you can hear the highs a tad bit more.

Comparing this to the Westone UM1 and Sennheiser CX-300 that I own personally, I like the M1 so much more. It does not feel as ‘empty’ as the UM1, and much more colorful than the CX-300.

After spending a whole day with the M1, I can’t wait to see how the M2 will do against its little brother.