It's easy to forget that the Internet is connected via a vast amount of switches and routers and with an ever increasing bandwidth demand as we get more and more connected devices, this backbone of the internet needs constant upgrades. Broadcom has announced a new product that should help boost the speed of the internet for the time being, as its latest network processor offers speeds of up to 100Gbps.

It's easy to forget that the Internet is connected via a vast amount of switches and routers and with an ever increasing bandwidth demand as we get more and more connected devices, this backbone of the internet needs constant upgrades. Broadcom has announced a new product that should help boost the speed of the internet for the time being, as its latest network processor offers speeds of up to 100Gbps.

The new product in question is the BCM88030 family of NPUs which sports 64 "custom processors" operating at 1GHz and Broadcom claims that the BCM88030 offers more than twice the throughput of any competing solution. This should be enough for a little while, at least if you consider that high-end switches and routers today are “limited” to 40Gbps.

Broadcom has also managed to integrate a wide range of features into the BCM88030, such as an OA&M engine, 1588 timing and synchronous Ethernet, a 10Gbps SerDes interface and 1/10/40/100Gbps Ethernet MACs which should not only help lower cost, but also reduce board space and power usage. The BCM88030 is compatible with what Broadcom calls "low-cost DDR3 DRAM", i.e. no fancy high-end XDR memory is needed to operate at 100Gbps speeds and this further helps to keep the cost down.

Broadcom is offering a range of SKUs of the BCM88030 for 100, 40 and 24Gbps speeds and the company is expecting to start shipping at production volume in the second half of the year. It's unlikely that we'll see any hardware based on the BCM88030 series this year, but come 2013 there should be some products in the market and hopefully they'll end up replacing older equipment sooner rather than later to help reduce congestion on the interweb.

Source: Broadcom