800px Tiananmen Square, Beijing, China 1988 (1) China bans searches for Tiananmen Square massacre

In yet another crackdown on free speech, China has banned searches for terms relating to the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, where hundreds of pro-democracy protesters were killed by government forces.

In yet another crackdown on free speech, China has banned searches for terms relating to the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre, where hundreds of pro-democracy protesters were killed by government forces.

 
The revolt on 4 June, 1989, 23 years ago to this day, is being censored from Chinese search engines, with terms like “six four,” “23,” “candle” and “never forget” failing to return any mention of the event.
 
There are even reports that the Chinese characters for the word “today” are banned and the emoticon for a candle has been disabled on Weibo, the country's equivalent to Twitter.
 
The move suggests a widespread government crackdown on any references to the killings on that day, which some human rights groups estimate could number into the thousands.
 
800px Tiananmen Square, Beijing, China 1988 (1) China bans searches for Tiananmen Square massacre
 
Searches for information on Tiananmen Square simply return tourist information on the location, conveniently glossing over one of a number of blotches on the history of the ruling regime. This has proven fairly effective in removing the negative connotations associated with that location, with many born in China since the event completely unaware of what happened.
 
The US government called on China to provide a “full public accounting of those killed, detained or missing,” and also called for those imprisoned to be freed. The request is likely to fall on deaf ears, however.
 
Google previously got into hot water with the Chinese government over its censorship of search results, resulting in a lengthy stand-off between the two before they eventually reached a compromise, where users can redirect to the Hong Kong website. Tensions still exist, however, and Google has been very vocal about its opposition to the regime's clampdown on freedom of information.
 
Source: BBC