Cisco says ‘good sites’ may have more malware than porn sites

badmalware Cisco says good sites may have more malware than porn sites

Cisco's 2013 Annual Security report has revealed that websites that appear to be safe-looking can have more dangerous malware links than what most people believe. The real bombshell was that pornography websites are often times a lot safer than ecommerce or search engine sites.

Cisco recently released their 2013 Annual Security report and the numbers are contradictory to what most people think. Cisco found that riskier links were not found on ‘shady’ sites but actually found more often on regular safe-looking sites such as search engines or online shopping sites.  In fact Cisco says that a person is 182 times as likely to download malware on a ‘safe’ site’s advertisements as opposed to a site promoting pornography.  

Cisco further noted that pharmaceutical and gambling sites were also not as likely to have malware in their advertisings either.

To the surprise of many readers a random ecommerce site is about 21 times more likely to get you infected with some kind of bug.  The report further stated that you would be 27 times more likely to download malware from a no-name search engine as opposed to a counterfeit software website.

The report also made it very clear that many Internet users often mislead themselves in regards to websites that might harbor malware. "Many security professionals—and certainly a large community of online users—hold preconceived ideas about where people are most likely to stumble across dangerous web malware," the report reads in part.

Two other interesting highlights in the report shows that Android malware grew by 2,577% (two-thousand five hundred and seventy-seven percent) in 2012.  It also shows that global spam e-mail volumes were down by 18% over all, and very curiously it drops by as much as 25% on the weekends.

Jack Taylor is an accomplished writer who works as a freelance journalist and has contributed to many award winning media agencies, which includes VRzone. Born in 1971, Taylor holds a Bachelor of Science with a focus in Journalism, graduating Magna Cum Laude. An eclectic writer, Taylor specializes in editorials, trending technologies and controversial topics such as hacktivism and government spying.