CISPA Being Pushed By US Senate

The controversial successor to SOPA and PIPA is being pushed by leadership in the Senate, and may soon make progress towards the President's desk.

Remember SOPA and PIPA, the pieces of legislation that sought to protect copyright by destroying fundamental ideas of how the Internet functions? There’s another piece of legislation, very similar in nature, and seeking to do the same things that SOPA and PIPA did making its way through the U.S. Senate. Currently the legislation, known as CISPA, is stalled on Capitol Hill, but recently there were two key indicators that progress would begin on working through the bill soon.

The first indicator was a statement made by Senator Harry Reid, in which he essentially promised action on the various cybersecurity bills floating through the Senate. He pushed forward the controversial bill, reportedly stating that “I [have] put everyone on notice: We are going to move to this bill at the earliest possible date,” meaning that the Democratic Party, currently in control of the Senate, is in fear of losing their position at the end of this election year and is looking to push legislation through before the election.

The second indicator is news that has surfaced regarding a potential compromise in the works regarding an issue that has kept the versions in the House and the Senate from being reconcilable, that issue being standards. The Senate bill includes mandatory standards, which the proponents in the Senate claim is necessary for the protection of the Internet infrastructure in the U.S., but to members of the House, controlled by the Republican Party, mandatory standards are a burden on business that will stifle and crush economic growth in the sector. Senator Lindsey Graham, however, said in an interview that a compromise is being drafted between the two groups, which would mean progress on the bill can be made.

All of this is happening on Congressional time scales, so don’t expect anything to happen any time soon, but it looks like their will soon be another bill for the various Internet communities to go to war against.