Galaxy have what is the hottest, most complex graphics card ever built at Computex. We have known for a long while that an official dual-GF100 card would be impossible, but Galaxy have gone ahead and created a truly insane card. The card is a 12 inches long dual-GF100 monster, with not one inch spared. It features 2 x 8-pin PCI-e power connectors.

small galaxy1 COMPUTEX: Galaxy demonstates dual GPU GTX 470

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Galaxy have what is the hottest, most complex graphics card ever built
at Computex. We have known for a long while that an official dual-GF100
card would be impossible, but Galaxy have gone ahead and created a truly
insane card. The card is a 12 inches long dual-GF100 monster, with not
one inch spared. It features 2 x 8-pin PCI-e power connectors.

small galaxy1 COMPUTEX: Galaxy demonstates dual GPU GTX 470

A single GTX 470 has a “official” TDP of 215W, though in Furmark-type stress situations, we have seen it consume closer to 250W. One has to question how much power this board will require. Simple logic suggests that the 2 8-pin connectors will not be enough – which give out 375W – without some serious downclocking and/or undervolting.

Of course, the Galaxy 470 Dual is a prototype, but it could see the light of day. If it does, we are not sure where it’s performance will be, though it is most likely to be a limited edition part. Certainly, the special edition overclocked HD 5970 4GB cards will continue to be the market leader. The question is where the Galaxy 470 Dual will perform against the reference HD 5970 – which fits well within the PCI-e SIG regulations of a maximum of 300W TDP. If the 470 were indeed to downclocked, as it seems likely, it will lose out to the official HD 5970, despite consuming a lot more power. Or, Galaxy could add a further 6-pin connector and leave the 470 at its default clocks, in which case it will just edge out the HD 5970.

Interestingly, the GTX 470 dual seems to feature 2GB of memory, rather than 2.56GB expected of a dual GTX 470. It is likely that the memory interface has been cut down to 256-bit to save power, or the six addition memory chips are at the back (unlikely).

There will be no official dual-GPU GF100 card from Nvidia, at least in the near future, though it is refreshing to know that AICs are working on their own solution. However, it seems likely that the performance crown is staying with ATI and its AIBs for a while. Whether it be the stock HD 5970 or the AIB-designed HD 5970 running at HD 5870 clocks. A dual GTX 470 can be an interesting product that will bridge the massive gap between the GTX 480 and the HD 5970 – or where a HD 5950 could be. It is likely that we will never seen a HD 5950, however, as ATI are preparing their next-generation Southern Islands products.

Reference: HotHardware