packer  Cool Trek Vostok Water Cooling Kit

After being battered by a trio of watercooling kits we are back at getting wet. This time round we find a kit from Cool-Trek, associated with the largest subglacial Lake in Antarctica. Will it cool that very well? Read on!

Central Processing Units are getting hotter, we all know that. Guess what? They are increasing in number too! 2006 is a year where we will see dual-core CPUs being implemented into common desktop systems. This means more power consumption and more heat.

Whilst this week had been a busy week for Team VR, we made it a point to treat you guys (our loyal readers) with a juicy article like this one. It’s so juicy (and wet), we got coolant all over our office carpet! Since it is unfortunate that there has not been much techbeats these few days (we are waiting for Conroe and Yonah capable motherboards, not to forget AM2), we took the time to take care of our cooling systems before Dual Core and Quad Core monsters decide to sneak into our office and bake us alive.

More CPUs, more heat! Why else do we need watercooling? As hardware enthusisasts, keeping our systems at stock speeds is major taboo. We overclock too, and we bump up voltages to keep things going smoothly. That’s why we need more cooling. And to help people like you and me, Cool-Trek has come up with a seriously wet kit to cool the CPU down nicely. Before that, I would like to commend Cool-Trek on making an effort in giving their product an original, though-provoking name.

intro  Cool Trek Vostok Water Cooling Kit

Lake Vostok is the largest subglacial lake in Antarctica, located under Russia’s Vostok (research) Station, 4 kilometers under the surface of the central Antarctic ice sheet. It was discovered in 1996 by Russian and British scientists. Lake Vostok is 250 kilometers long by 50 kilometers wide. Water temperature is around hovers around −3 degrees Celsius, below freezing point due to ice pressure. It was suggested that Lake Vostok could possess a unique habitat for ancient bacteria with an isolated microbial gene pool developed perhaps 500000 years ago.

Sounds cool enough? You bet!