cm s Coolermaster Centurion 530 Review

Today, we will be taking a look at the Coolermaster Centurion 530, a steel casing with an aluminum front bezel, poised to take over the Centurion 5 case, which has been widely popular with budget enthusiasts.

cm Coolermaster Centurion 530 Review

Introduction

Coolermaster has been making casings since the late 1990s, and was well-known
for their Active Thermal Convection System (ATCS) Range of casings; every ATCS
then had quality that could rival a Soldam. Coolermaster has since changed it’s
direction for their enthusiast range of casings. Instead of offering high quality
aluminum casings that caters for the niche enthusiast market, Coolermaster has
started producing a series of aluminum and steel casings to cater for the mid-range
enthusiast market, with Full Aluminum Casings tagged as Praetorian and Steel/Aluminum
Hybrid casings tagged as Centurion/Stacker. Today, We will be taking a look
at the Coolermaster Centurion 530, a steel casing with an aluminum front bezel,
poised to take over the Centurion 5 case which has been widely popular with
budget enthusiasts.

Specifications

Available ColorsSilver
DimensionsL495 x W235 x H460 mm
Weight10kg
MaterialAluminum bezel, SECC chassis
Motherboard SupportmATX, ATX; 12” x 9.6” (30.5cm x 24.5 cm)
5.25″ Bays5 (Exposed)
3.5″ Bays1 (Exposed);
5 (Hidden)
FansOne 120x120x25mm front fan ( Intake);
One 120x120x25mm rear fan ( Exhaust ) (optional)
Front I/OUSB2.0 x 2; MIC x 1; SPK x 1; IEEE1394 x 1
Power SupplyStandard ATX PS2, 380W (option)

Initial Impressions

This is perhaps the first Coolermaster Casing that fell into my hands after
the ATCS range; the casing doesn’t scream of quality, but is definitely decently
built. Coolermaster has succeeded in integrating functionality & looks into
their cases while keeping prices reasonable. Coolermaster re-improvised their
casing stamps, sacrificing one exposed 3.5″ bay for a 5.25″ bay, which
is a pretty good move because we are seeing enthusiasts loading their PCs up
with fancy functional panels and 5.25″ hard drive coolers to the extent
that the standard 4 5.25″ bays found in most mid tower casings just isn’t
enough anymore.

Coolermaster has also kept the front panel clean of any buttons and I/O ports
by placing all the buttons and I/O on another panel on the top of the casing
instead. It might be a blessing in disguise for those who places their casing
on the the floor as it will definitely be more accessible but it might also
pose as problem for those who place their casings on a table though.

Let’s waste no time and get rolling on with the pictures.