Creative Market Creative Market: Photoshops answer to the app store

In an attempt to streamline the custom fonts, textures, patterns and more that users have created and strewn across the web, Photoshop has received the equivalent of an app store: The Creative Market

Anybody who is familiar with Photoshop can attest that while several different websites exist for finding resources such as patterns, brushes, fonts or textures, the process of finding what you need is generally a rather disorganized one. Creative Market hopes to change that. Their Photoshop extension and API allows you to quickly find the resources you need without having to interrupt your workflow to search via Google.

Apart from a tool for finding resources, users can also easily move their resources to other computers, check for license restrictions on their items and as would be expected, they'll have access to weekly updates of new things.

 

Darius profile Creative Market: Photoshops answer to the app store

Darius Monsef, internet philanthropist and Jason Segal look alike

 

Creative Market has taken a long time to realize. The company was founded by Darius Monsef nearly eight years ago and was at the time a community for swapping color palettes and talking about the design process. He did consider turning the project into a proper business, but with little financial margin for color samples, he didn't see it as a viable business.

 

Eventually MetLife and Harper Collins approached Monsef, hoping to purchase patterns they had found on the site, and at this point he realized he could automate the process and create something akin to what Creative Market is today. There is a lot of competition in the resource exchange industry, with iStockphoto and Dafont being good examples of alternatives to Monsef's service. However, Creative Market is the only 3rd party tool that allows finding resources from within Photoshop itself, and that is a pretty big perk.

 

According to Monsef, Photoshop has roughly 40 million users who spend about $150 per year on design elements. That amounts to a $6 billion market; a market which has hardly been touched.