crytek Cryteks future is in free to play titles

Cevat Yerli, CEO of Crytek, has revealed that the company’s future lies in free to play (F2P) titles.  Sony, among other big names in the gaming industry, is already putting big money into developing upcoming F2P titles such as Bullet Run, so it’s understandable that Crytek seeks to head in the F2P direction also.

Cevat Yerli, CEO of Crytek, has revealed that the company’s future lies in free to play (F2P) titles.  Sony, among other big names in the gaming industry, is already putting big money into developing upcoming F2P titles such as Bullet Run, so it’s understandable that Crytek seeks to head in the F2P direction also.

Yerli made it clear at the 2012 E3 that his company will not be putting any more effort into developing boxed products in the future.  Warface, Crytek Kiev’s multiplayer FPS, will mark the studio’s entrance into the F2P realm.  Yerli went as far as to say that Crytek’s commitment to F2P development involves not only effort but also monetary investments to back it its product. 

“As evident in Warface, our approach is to ensure the best quality, console game quality.  That implies budgets of between $10 million to $30 million, so no compromise there, but at the price-point of $0 entry,” says Yerli. 

Step aside Kickstarter game developers, big time gaming studios may not beat you with passion and dedication for the art, but they will surely beat you with money.

Many current boxed products are “milking customers to death” Yerli claims—because gamers have to dish out the initial investment to buy the boxed product and if they want the updates and DLCs, they need to pay additional fees.  Crytek, along with other major studios, believes that the future of gaming lies in F2P because games will become services rather than the traditional standalone products. 

The good news is major game studios, such as Crytek, are considering to become more involved in the F2P market, and the bad news is that they will have loads of money to back up their F2P games—bad news because independent and startup developers will have a much harder time competing in the F2P arena.

Source: videogamer.com