DSC08687 Cubitek Has Big Aluminum Case Plans for 2012

Cubitek wants to play in the big league of premium all-aluminum PC cases, targeting almost every consumer form-factor: ATX mid-tower, EATX full-tower, HPATX, micro-ATX, and even mini-ITX. All part of the company's new ICE series, these cases will be fabricated with extruded aluminum that's as much as 3 mm thick in some parts, making the cases both sturdy, and radiate heat better. We got to take a peak at each of these.

The series starts off with the most common PC form-factor, the ATX mid-tower. The ATX Ice is larger than most mid-towers, treading very close to being categorized a full-tower. It measures 230 x 508.5 x 513 mm (WxHxD), weighing in at 7.1 kg (net.). As mentioned earlier, Cubitek designed these cases with aluminum sheets as thick as 3 mm to give them the sturdiness of 1 mm thick SECC steel.

DSC08783 Cubitek Has Big Aluminum Case Plans for 2012

Pictured above is the main facade. You can find four exposed 5.25-inch drive bays, and a dust-protected inlet for the 200 mm intake fan. You can also get an idea of the outer texture of the aluminum body, dark brushed aluminum.

DSC08826 Cubitek Has Big Aluminum Case Plans for 2012

The internals don't used anodized aluminum, rather exposed. This helps with radiating heat. Although some cable management holes are rubber-valved, there are some wide open holes, such as the one next to the PSU bay, a cutout over the CPU socket area (to help with handling coolers with backplates), and one on the top-left corner of the motherboard tray (for CPU power capbles. You can immediately tell that Cubitek's Ice cases are not tool-free.

DSC08807 Cubitek Has Big Aluminum Case Plans for 2012

There's nothing "loud" about the rear panel. You find the usual PSU bay at the bottom, a 120 mm grilled fan exhaust, two rubber-valved holes for water cooling tubing, and the expansion slot bays. Beating the ATX specification, there are eight bays instead of seven. This should help with multi-graphics card setups in which one of the graphics cards occupies the bottom-most expansion slot of an ATX motherboard.