Otherwise healthy year-over-year increases in earnings and revenue aren’t enough to address AMD’s debt issue.

amd stage apu 13 1024x552 Debt is proving to be a drag on AMD

Continued growth in AMD’s non-traditional markets have allowed the company to continue growing its revenue, but debt payments are hurting its profitability according to its second-quarter earnings report announced late Thursday.

AMD reported Thursday second quarter revenue of $1.44 billion, a 24 percent increase from the same quarter last year, and a net loss of $36 million. AMD’s debt payments for the quarter stood at $49 million. If debt was not factored into AMD’s earnings report for this quarter, the company would have posted a profit of $67 million.

“The second quarter capped off a solid first half of the year for AMD with strong revenue growth and improved financial performance,” said Rory Read, AMD’s CEO, in a press release. “Our transformation strategy is on track and we expect to deliver full year non-GAAP profitability and year-over-year revenue growth. We continue to strengthen our business model and shape AMD into a more agile company offering differentiated solutions for a diverse set of markets.

Looking at AMD’s business divisions, its Graphics and Visual Solutions business, which makes semi-custom chips for customers such as Microsoft and Sony reported a 141 percent increase in revenue to $772 million. The division’s operating income was $82 million compared with $91 million last quarter and breakeven in the same quarter last year. The decline, reportedly, was from lower GPU shipments while the year-over-year increase was from higher custom SoC shipments due to the launch of next-generation consoles.

AMD’s division that ships PC processors didn’t do as well. Revenue in the Computing Solutions Group dropped 20 percent from a year ago, to $669 million, as demand for AMD’s microprocessors slackens.

All things considered AMD looks as if its continuing along its path of transformation and recovery, albeit at a slower pace. AMD’s debt crushes its profitability, but it the company is able to continue to make debt payments it will have the funds available to continue to operate at current levels.