Following a painful, brutal first year, the tables appeared to be finally turning for Microsoft’s experimental Windows RT platform, courtesy of a new, considerably upgraded Surface RT and the unexpected keeping of the old 10.6-inch tab in the company’s product line-up for a $350 price point.

Dell XPS 10 Dell discontinues XPS 10 tablet, leaves Microsoft stranded on Windows RT island

But ultimately, it seems to be one step forward, two steps back for Win RT once again. Dell has apparently scrapped the XPS 10 slate off its official online store, directing potential buyers towards the Windows 8-based Latitude 10 and mentioning nothing of a possible stock replenishing.

True, this could make way for a follow-up of sorts and there actually have been rumors floating around about Dell prepping a second-gen RT pad. In the end though, the number three PC manufacturer of the world will probably just focus on the 8-inch Venue, the mystery 10-incher spotted in a leaked roadmap of sorts not long ago and Inspiron 11, all powered by Windows 8.1.

As for Redmond’s other RT partners, they’ve all stepped out of the game already, from Asus to Lenovo to Samsung. And worst of all, they don’t look keen to gamble one more time with rehashes of their VivoTab RT, IdeaPad Yoga 11 or ATIV Tab. Ever.

Dell XPS 10 2 Dell discontinues XPS 10 tablet, leaves Microsoft stranded on Windows RT island

Meanwhile, Nokia is heavily tipped to enter the feeble arena with a Lumia 2520 (aka “Sirius”), but, since Microsoft is on the verge of acquiring the Finnish business, they’ll technically still be the only ones tackling the (non-existent) niche. That is, if and only if the 2520 will see daylight, as a last-minute cancelation is in the cards, according to some sources.

I guess now would be a good time for Steve Ballmer (or whoever calls the Microsoft shots nowadays) to start feeling a little ridiculous about keeping up this Windows RT charade with a new Surface. What’s the point, guys, do you really have nothing else to do with your money? Like maybe take a business 101 class or something.

Source: PC World