Mitsubishi Electronics was also on the show and boy did they have an unusual display on show, namely a 19.2-inch screen with 1920×360 resolution. The odd resolution and size gives it a 16:3 aspect ratio, something we've never heard of or seen before. The display is intended for digital signage and "gaming" (read gambling) applications as well as some other niche markets. It also looks great for displaying panoramic pictures on, but we wouldn't bet any money on the fact that we'll see this at a digital photo frame in the future.

Also at the show was Korean Hydis Technologies, a company we haven't heard of before, but it was demoing an interesting 5.6-inch display using its HFFS technology (FFS stands for Fringe Field Switching) which is a technology that is similar to S-IPS. The technology is owned by Hydis and is offering improved viewing angles and outdoors readability.

The 5.6-inch display on show featured 178 degree viewing angles in all directions, a brightness of 300 cm/m2 and a contrast ratio of 500:1, but what really made it special was the resolution, as at 1280×800 this is something of a one of a kind display. Currently no-one seems to be using it in any retail products we're aware of, but we can see this ending up in some hybrid smartphone/tablet products in the future.

Taiwanese Chilin was demoing a gorgeous 56-inch display intended for medical imaging and in the past has many of these screens been stuck with black and white due to the high resolution requirements. Not so in this case as this tiny little screen is in full colour and as if that wasn't good enough, it sports QHD (not to be confused with qHD) or Quad Full HD resolution, or simply a pixel count of 3840×2160. Expect this to become the standard TV resolution in a decade or two.