60601102 surgery Doctors trial Kinect for surgery

Doctors are trialling Microsoft's Kinect camera and software to help with surgeries, further expanding the uses of the motion tracking device beyond console gaming.

Doctors are trialling Microsoft's Kinect camera and software to help with surgeries, further expanding the uses of the motion tracking device beyond console gaming.

 
St. Thomas' Hospital in London, in association with Microsoft Research and Lancaster University, is testing the Kinect's gesture controls and voice commands with its surgeons carrying out keyhole surgery, allowing the team to interact with a computer that shows a 3D image of the part of the body that is being operated on.
 
The surgeons have responded positively to the technology, calling it “easy to use.” Traditionally a surgeon would have to shout commands across the room to someone who would operate the computer with a keyboard and mouse, but the new approach gives greater control and provides less disruption, and also prevents contamination that is possible from touching computer peripherals during an operation.
 
 Doctors trial Kinect for surgery
 
The Kinect has proved a popular alternative to Nintendo's Wii console, but it has also become a major tool outside of gaming. It has been considered for home security and is even being used to help dock satellites in space
 
This latest use in surgical theatres could become the norm within the next 10 to 15 years, according to John Brennan, president of the British Society for Endovascular Therapy.
 
Source: BBC