Domino’s Pizza experiments with drone delivery, no tip required

DomiCopter 300x187 Dominos Pizza experiments with drone delivery, no tip required

Image Source: Dominos’s Pizza UKandROI YouTube channel

When we normally hear or read about drones, we immediately think of warfare or surveillance technology, but in actuality drones are quickly becoming an big part of civilian hobby use.  Now a Domino’s franchise in the U.K. has taken drone technology a step further by experimenting with fresh pizza delivery.

The ‘DomiCopter”, as it is called, was the first and only test of a pizza  delivery done with a drone and according Domino’s head office in Michigan (U.S.), it was the brainchild of the independent chain office in the U.K.  Domino’s, which is always looking for new ways to promote their products, called on help from a creative digital agency called T+Biscuits that operates in Shoreditch, England, which is an area located just outside of London.   On the the T+Biscuits website concerning the story behind the DomiCopter, they write, “We were looking at innovative ways to deliver pizza and thought, ‘what is cooler than a flying pizza?’.. it turns out not much.”

Working with the drone provided by a company called AeroSight, T+Biscuits was able to produce a flawless flight delivery of two hot pizzas and all done with an approximate 10-minute flight time over the village of Shoreditch.  The response and feedback was overwhelming, and in just under 48 hours the delivery video has received nearly 150,000 views.

For now the drone delivered pizza is just in the experimental stages and really more of a publicity stunt, but the actual drone delivered pizza was proof of concept.

Sadly, we can’t get our hopes up of  having  a drone delivered pizza anytime soon.  While unarmed drones are perfectly legal in the U.S.(for now), and other remote-controlled aircraft are legal to fly, the FAA currently bans pilotless aircraft being used for commercial purposes.

DomiCopter 300x187 Dominos Pizza experiments with drone delivery, no tip required

Image Source: Dominos’s Pizza UKandROI YouTube channel

When we normally hear or read about drones, we immediately think of warfare or surveillance technology, but in actuality drones are quickly becoming an big part of civilian hobby use.  Now a Domino’s franchise in the U.K. has taken drone technology a step further by experimenting with fresh pizza delivery.

The ‘DomiCopter”, as it is called, was the first and only test of a pizza  delivery done with a drone and according Domino’s head office in Michigan (U.S.), it was the brainchild of the independent chain office in the U.K.  Domino’s, which is always looking for new ways to promote their products, called on help from a creative digital agency called T+Biscuits that operates in Shoreditch, England, which is an area located just outside of London.   On the the T+Biscuits website concerning the story behind the DomiCopter, they write, “We were looking at innovative ways to deliver pizza and thought, ‘what is cooler than a flying pizza?’.. it turns out not much.”

Working with the drone provided by a company called AeroSight, T+Biscuits was able to produce a flawless flight delivery of two hot pizzas and all done with an approximate 10-minute flight time over the village of Shoreditch.  The response and feedback was overwhelming, and in just under 48 hours the delivery video has received nearly 150,000 views.

For now the drone delivered pizza is just in the experimental stages and really more of a publicity stunt, but the actual drone delivered pizza was proof of concept.

Sadly, we can’t get our hopes up of  having  a drone delivered pizza anytime soon.  While unarmed drones are perfectly legal in the U.S.(for now), and other remote-controlled aircraft are legal to fly, the FAA currently bans pilotless aircraft being used for commercial purposes.

Jack Taylor is an accomplished writer who works as a freelance journalist and has contributed to many award winning media agencies, which includes VRzone. Born in 1971, Taylor holds a Bachelor of Science with a focus in Journalism, graduating Magna Cum Laude. An eclectic writer, Taylor specializes in editorials, trending technologies and controversial topics such as hacktivism and government spying.