Intel has pushed back the launch of Dothan, its next Pentium M
notebook processor, in order to make changes to the chip’s circuitry. The Dothan
chip had been expected to make its debut in mid-February. It is now scheduled to
ship in the second quarter of 2004. Validation tests turned up a glitch that
would hamper the manufacturability of the chip. Although Dothan’s performance
was not affected by the glitch, a circuitry redesign was required. Intel will
offer the fix in a new version of the chip, which it calls a "stepping"
internally.

Intel was able to ship Prescott, its upcoming Pentium 4 chip,
during the fourth quarter, even though it did not escape changes. The chip had
been tweaked to increase its clock speed potential. Prescott is expected to come
out early next month. Prescott and Dothan will offer higher clock speeds and
some other performance improvements. Supplies of Prescott may be tight at first,
but Intel plans to rapidly increase production of the chip throughout 2004.
Prescott is expected to represent more than 50 percent of shipments of
performance desktop products from Intel in the second quarter. It will also make
up a significant percentage of shipments of chips for lower-cost PCs as well.
The switchover to Prescott will be the fastest ever and will allow Intel to
quickly transition our desktop products to 300-millimeter wafers, lowering our
unit costs over the next couple of years.

Intel has pushed back the launch of Dothan, its next Pentium M
notebook processor, in order to make changes to the chip’s circuitry. The Dothan
chip had been expected to make its debut in mid-February. It is now scheduled to
ship in the second quarter of 2004. Validation tests turned up a glitch that
would hamper the manufacturability of the chip. Although Dothan’s performance
was not affected by the glitch, a circuitry redesign was required. Intel will
offer the fix in a new version of the chip, which it calls a "stepping"
internally.

Intel was able to ship Prescott, its upcoming Pentium 4 chip,
during the fourth quarter, even though it did not escape changes. The chip had
been tweaked to increase its clock speed potential. Prescott is expected to come
out early next month. Prescott and Dothan will offer higher clock speeds and
some other performance improvements. Supplies of Prescott may be tight at first,
but Intel plans to rapidly increase production of the chip throughout 2004.
Prescott is expected to represent more than 50 percent of shipments of
performance desktop products from Intel in the second quarter. It will also make
up a significant percentage of shipments of chips for lower-cost PCs as well.
The switchover to Prescott will be the fastest ever and will allow Intel to
quickly transition our desktop products to 300-millimeter wafers, lowering our
unit costs over the next couple of years.