electronic frontier foundation EFF gets $500k from donors to fight flawed patent system

The Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) got an early Christmas present to help them with the battle to bring about serious patent reform. The money came from Mark Cuban and famous indie game developer Notch with each of them donating $250,000 to the foundation.

The Electronic Freedom Foundation (EFF) is best known for helping people who have happened to run afoul of the law and their activities online, but the EFF is also working hard at trying to bring about some serious change in our patent system. This kind of work takes money however, and that is something that the EFF doesn't have a lot of as they are an organization that exists totally on contributions from the public.  Therefore, the EFF hasn’t been as front and center in the battle over patent law as they would like to be.

Well, thanks to an early Christmas present that situation could change in the new year. In an announcement made on the EFF's site we found out that Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban and Minecraft creator Markus Persson (also known as Notch to the world's Minecraft fans) each donated $250,000 to the EFF to help the organization move forward in their push for patent reform.

In what might seem at first to be a joke, Cuban's money will go toward creating a new position at the EFF entitled "The Mark Cuban Chair To Eliminate Stupid Patents."  However, Staff Attorney Julie Samuels, who will be filling that position, assured us that it is no joke. As well, part of Cuban's money will be used towards hiring Daniel Nazer, an experienced patent lawyer, who will join the EFF as a Staff Attorney.

Persson, a longtime proponent of software reform believes that there needs to be some deep and meaningful reform to the patent system in order to protect software development, will see his donated money used in a more general manner when it comes to the EFF and their fight for patent reform. EFF's Rebecca Jeschke says that this donation from Persson will allow them to increase their activism campaigns, push for reform in the courts, as well as trying to educate politicians about what is wrong with the current patent system and how it needs to change for the future.

via The Next Web