Enough Project criticizes Nintendo’s humanity effort

enough project logo Enough Project criticizes Nintendos humanity effort

Apparently Nintendo isn’t committed to ensuring human welfare when it comes to collecting raw materials for its products.  At least that’s what an organization called Enough Project is claiming.

Apparently Nintendo isn’t committed to ensuring human welfare when it comes to collecting raw materials for its products.  At least that’s what an organization called Enough Project is claiming.

In a recent report from CNN, Sasha Lezhnev, senior policy analyst at the Enough Project, said that Nintendo has essentially done nothing to help prevent violent resource wars.

“Nintendo is, I believe, the only company that has basically refused to acknowledge the issue or demonstrate they are making any sort of effort on it,” said Lezhnev. “And this is despite a good two years of trying to get in contact with them.”

In countries such as the Democratic Republic of the Congo where rich deposits of tin, tantalum and tungsten are found, there are constant outbreaks of violence over ownership.  The mines are hotspots for bloodshed between the military and paramilitaries, and more often than not, innocent people are stuck in the middle of it all.

Nintendo released the following statement shortly after defending its position:

“[Nintendo] outsources the manufacture and assembly of all Nintendo products to our production partners and therefore is not directly involved in the sourcing of raw materials that are ultimately used in our products…We nonetheless take our social responsibilities as a global company very seriously and expect our production partners to do the same.”

Enough Project rates companies based how much ‘effort’ they put into ensuring humane activities in areas in which the companies operate, and Nintendo was the only company to receive a 0 rating.  Both Microsoft and Apple had a rating for 38, which meant that they made strides in auditing their supply chains, pushed for legislations, and other acts to help promote clean trade in places like the Congo.

Oh look, a bug!