eu court of justice EU to bring Germany to court over not storing user data

The European Commission is bringing Germany to court over failing to store telephone and email data for a six month period, as required under European Union laws.

The European Commission is bringing Germany to court over failing to store telephone and email data for a six month period, as required under European Union laws.

 
The Commission is seeking a fine from the European Court of Justice against Berlin for not implementing the 2006 EU directive, which requires telecommunications companies to store phone records and internet logs for at least six months so that police can more easily investigate crimes.
 
The directive was to be implemented in a new German law, but in March 2010 the country's highest court overturned the law, calling it a grave intrusion to the right to privacy. The court called for the law to be revised so that it did not infringe upon the rights of individuals. Narrower legislation has since been proposed, but the Commission said that this would not fully comply with the EU directive.
 
eu court of justice EU to bring Germany to court over not storing user data
 
"Ongoing delays in transposing the directive into national law are likely to have a negative effect on the internal market for electronic communications and on the ability of police and justice authorities to detect, investigate and prosecute serious crime," the Commission said, according to the Associated Press.
 
The Commission is hoping to secure a fine of €315,000 for every day that Germany fails to comply with the EU law, starting with the day of the court ruling. If secured this could add up to millions if the country's Chancellor, Angela Merkel, fails to pass the law, which won't be easy, given a strong stance against privacy invasion in the country.